Institute for International Cooperation and Development

IICD Michigan was incorporated in 1997 as a not-for-profit organization in the state of Michigan. IICD Michigan is an independent research non-profit. The Internal Revenue Service has determined that IICD Michigan is an organization as described in the revenue code 501(c) 3. This means that IICD is exempt from federal taxation of its activities and that donors can deduct donations to IICD from the income declared in their tax return. The organization will not discriminate by race, ethnicity, national origins, religious belief, gender or orientation.

 

Job Opening

 

International Specialist Educator           

Institute for International Cooperation and Development has a job opening for an International Specialist Educator.

 

Responsibilities:

  • §Responsible for teaching English to foreign students as a second language.
  • §Responsible for giving courses about different cultures, ethnic groups, traditions, country development and political structure.
  • §Responsible for hosting and taking part in workshops, instructing about the conditions and challenges in living and working in rural developing communities and introducing simple solutions for issues within health, hygiene, and food production.
  • §Responsible for preparing and delivering lectures and conducting workshops regarding adjusting to life in third-world settings, with emphasis on communication, cultural do's & don’ts based on specific ethnicity, personal health and hygiene, travel arrangements, immigration documentation requirements and procedures, handling of money and personal security.
  • §Prepare course materials and assignments.
  • §Evaluate and grade examinations and assignments.
  • §Responsible for keeping abreast of development in the field by reading current literature, attending talks and conferences, and talking with colleagues.
  • §Conduct data collection, research and analysis regarding the ethnic development projects in Africa and Latin America.
  • §Initiate proposals for implementing new educational methods and methods of instruction in Africa and Latin America. Facilitate promoting the programs of IICD and enrolling participants for future teams.
  • §Assist the Director in monitoring the Institute's teaching program budget.
  • §Responsible for implementing Social Action research projects.

 

Minimum hiring requirements:

Five years’ experience as a teacher, instructor, or trainer, paid or unpaid, in a third-world country or environment.

Two weeks per year in a 3rd-world country to perform evaluations and teach courses.

Five years / 60 months’ experience as a teacher or instructor or trainer.

 

 

Please mail applications to:

Institute for International Cooperation and Development

56968 Dailey Road, Dowagiac, Michigan 49047             

 

 

About IICD

IICD Michigan

Executive Summary

The IICD staff gathered data from all the 178 participants who started the 18- Development Instructor program during the six-year period of 2008 to 2013. During their program each participant was given a questionnaire every third month.

144 participants completed the program and 34 dropped out, most after a few weeks. In total the participants filled in 765 questionnaires.

My main findings from analyzing the data:

• 76% of participants who completed had a bachelor degree or higher

• 82% of participants who completed noted "Doing good" as main motivation for participation. But of those who dropped out of the program only 38% had noted "Doing good" as main motivation for participation.

• From month 3 to 6 participant capacity improved significantly as measured along 12 skills parameters rated from 1 to 5. The average increase was 1.0 along this scale. Positive change is found along all skills parameters and during each of the six years frin 2008-2013.

• Questionnaires during and after the service period ask for narrative statements from participants. An analysis shows that Development Instructors are formulated about results achieved, social impact of their work and of personal lessons learnt, and that they have been role models especially for many young people in Africa. A personal commitment to doing good also in the future is expressed by many DIs.

• As recommendation for future programs and future DIs after ending the service period, some DIs point at improvement in planning and execution of program and most point at the importance of a positive attitude and commitment to social change as long term effort.

It is my conclusion that the data strengthen (verify) the base hypothesis that "it is possible, by a training program that includes extensive international and national practice to transform the participant, in essense making him a better and more capable person while at the same time improving the world we live in."

1. Introduction

This document presents and concludes on data collected as part of the Educational Development Research carried out at IICD, MI from 2008 to 2013.

The base hypothesis of the research was that it is possible, by a training program that includes extensive international and national practice to transform the participant, in essense making him a better and more capable person while at the same time improving the world we live in.

2. Data collected through questionnaires

The IICD staff has from 2008 to 2013, after instruction from Anne K. Wendelboe, Director of International Development and Research, gathered data from all participating Development Instructors using standardized questionnaires given five times with 3-month intervals from the starting date of the DI. This procedure is in line with the data collection presented in the document "Educational Development Research Concept of IICD" in June 2007 (p. 11-12) submitted as supportive evidence to the petition to UCCIS for Mrs. Wendelboe.

3. Data Presentation and conclusions

3.1 Data set 1: Start of program

Number of participants who completed the program education level, gender, and their main motivation for participation for each of the years 2008 to 2013 and absolute and relative totals for 2008-13:

 

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2008-13

Pct.

Educational level:

Bachelor degree

 

19

22

15

17

19

17

109

 

76%

High school degree

1

5

8

6

6

9

35

24%

Gender:

Male

 

6

12

10

7

11

11

57

 

40%

Female

14

15

13

16

14

15

87

60%

Main motivation:

Personal experience

 

 3

6

 8

 9

3

7

 36

 

25%

Do good to others

 17

21

 15

 14

 22

 19

 108

 75%

Total

20

27

23

23

25

26

144

100%

 Conclusion on data set 1:

178 participants joined the program, 144 (81%) completed or are about to complete (15 participants who started in late 2013), while 34 discontinued .

Three in four participants who completed had a bachelor degree or higher. The rest had some college or at least a high school degree.

There were more female than male participants.

Three in four participants who completed stated as their main motivation for joining the program to do good. The rest pointed at the personal experience as main reason.

Among the 34 that did not complete the program 62% stated personal experience as main reason to have joined. A motivation to do good was thus a predictor for the success of the participant.

3.2 Data set 2 and 3: After 3 and after 6 months

Average participant personal capacity development ratings for each of the 12 capacity dimensions after 3 months and after 6 months of training for 2008-13:

 

 

Rating after

3 months

Rating after

6 months

Change in rating +/-

1

Ability to plan

2.6

3.8

1.2

2

Ability to work efficiently

2.7

3.9

1.2

3

Ability to take decisions

2.5

3.9

1.4

4

Capacity to communicate

2.5

3.5

1.0

5

Skills of handling economy

2.6

3.7

1.1

6

Personal flexibility

2.5

3.6

1.1

7

Reliability and honesty

3.4

4.1

0.7

8

Ability to keep agreements

3.4

4.1

0.7

9

Taking responsibility

2.9

4.1

1.2

10

Readiness to reach out to team

2.8

3.8

1.0

11

Care for well being of others

2.6

3.6

1.0

12

Ability to build relationships

2.8

3.8

1.0

 

Total average

2.8

3.8

1.0

 

Total INDEX

34.0

45.8

11.8

Participant average personal capacity development index after 3 months and after 6 months of training for each year 2008 to 2013 and for 2008-13:

 

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2008-13

Index after 3 mths.

36.5

39.6

35.1

31.3

28.2

33.5

34.0

Index after 6 mths.

46.9

46.9

47.5

45.7

43.2

45.2

45.8

Change +/-

10.4

7.3

12.3

14.4

15.0

11.7

11.8

Conclusion on data set 2 and 3:

The data show that on average the participants improved significantly on all the skills (parameters) measuring personal capacity from month 3 to month 6 of the training. Increase was highest in skills, where the students had initially rated themselves lowest: Ability to plan, Ability to work efficiently and Ability to take decisions. Increase was lowest in skill where they had rated themselves highest: Reliability and honesty and Ability to keep agreements. In total average increase over 3 months for each skill was 1 (on the scale from 1 to 5).

The average index (sum of the 12 parameters) for each of the six years, 2008-2013 shows that there in each of the years was an increase in the personal capacity of the participants. The increase was highest in 2012, where the participants had initially rated themselves lowest and smallest in 2009, when the participants had initially rated themselves highest.

The consistency of the trends indicates that the improvements in personal capacities are reliably represented in the data, providing a valid picture of the results of the training.

3.3 Data set 4 and 5: After 9 and after 12 months

Questionnaire 4 and 5 are filled in at the mid-point of the service period in Africa and upon return to the Institute after the service period. Questions are of a qualitative nature asking participants for narrative statements and thus well suited for debate but not for statistical analysis. Main questions ask about results achieved, impact of the work in Africa and personal lessons learnt. To provide an example of responses I have taken summarized answers to questionnaire 4 and 5 from the 25 participants in 2012.

Results achieved, impact of work and lessons learnt by participants in 2012:

 

Results achieved:

Impact of work:

Lessons learnt:

 

3 participants in clothes sales and fundraising projects

Started first one then more shops

Improved marketing

Higher sales

More income

Creation of jobs

Training workers in business management

Offering affordable clothes to community

Generated funds for development

Location matters

Work to make things happen

Community needs to learn planning and money skills

The importance of raising funds for development

Importance of finding, hiring and training good staff

13 participants at vocational schools and teacher training colleges

Classes in IT, crafts and evening lessons

Started family gardens

Built latrines

Women's health clubs

Got in-kind donations

Started brick-production

Built one school

Improved library systems

Held pedagogical workshops

Improved teaching and learning methods

Improved health and nutrition in community

Empowerment of women

Use of less charcoal

Income generating activities initiated

More toddlers in preschools

Lessened impact of flooding event

Teaching skills; that teaching and teachers are needed

The importance of hygiene

That one person can ignite change

The strengths of the Poor

We/I need to do more

Women as agents of change

I must continue working with poor people

Despite cultural differences we need to learn and support other people

9 participants in community development and farmers club projects

Planted 20,000 trees

Established gardens and moringa production

Taught cooking, nutrition and hygiene

Started sports clubs

Established hand washing systems

Renovated schools

Improved food security and nutrition standard

Improved hygiene and health

Women better organized

Increased understanding of environment

Understand that small actions can have big impact

That small improvements can lead to bigger changes

That I must be an engine of change

Treeplanting, gardens, nutrition and health are central

People must organize; women must go together

Together we can build another world

Conclusion on data set 4 and 5:

An analysis of narrative statements shows that participants are formulated about results achieved, social impact of their work and of personal lessons learnt. A personal commitment to doing good also in the future is expressed by many of the participating DIs. They are aware that they have improved lives for many people and have been role models especially for many young people in Africa.

Results, impact and lessons learnt depends to some extent on the type of project where the DIs worked:

- Those in clothes sale and fundraising projects stress the importance of business and good organization and the skill sets related to economic development

- Those working in schools stress the importance of education and training, of overcoming cultural differences, empowering women and of raising funds for social projects

- Those in community development and farmers clubs stress the importance of environmental protection, food security, nutrition and health and of organizing people for action.

Recommendations for future programs and DIs

As part of the last questionnaire (Data set 5) the DIs describe, discuss and focus on the future of the DI program and give their personal recommendations. Some take the format of suggestions for the structure of the program others touch on attitudes needed by future DIs.

Program recommendations: Improve planning, evaluation of plans and adjustment of preparation period - Produce better plans for the Service period in the preparation period - Include more knowledge of the specific project in preparations.

Attitude recommendations: Keep yourself open - Stay focused - Keep your goals - Don't expect miracles, be realistic - Prepare to do what it takes - Work with everybody, don't be judgmental.

The recommendations reflect a good deal of realism and commitment to doing good in a world with great social, economic and health problems.

4. Testing of the main hypothesis

It is my conclusion that the data collected strengthen the main hypothesis that "it is possible, by a training program that includes extensive international and national practice to transform the participant, in essence making him a better and more capable person while at the same time improving the world we live in" for the following reasons:

• The data confirm that the training program significantly improved the capacities of the participants.

• The data show many positive results achieved and impact of the work that improved the conditions for local people and communities

• The data show that the participant improved understanding on development issues in poor communities in Africa, acquired skills important to doing development work, in essence to doing good.

• The data show that many participants strengthened their personal commitment to doing good.

These results were achieved experimentally by carrying out the training program with its service period in Africa over a six-year period with 144 participating Development Instructors.

The data built on personal questions. This methodology may have a bias towards expressing what participants expect that others want them to tell, however, the IICD staff additionally interacted with the participants during the training program and performed site visits in Africa. This would tend to limit the bias. The fairly large sample and the length of the experiment further add to reliability of the data.

34 of 178 or 19% of participants dropped out of the program. A majority of this subset of participants had "Personal experience" as main motivation, whereas the great majority of those who completed the program had "Doing good" as main motivation, the main hypothesis has, from the research data at hand, thus only been verified for participants who in the outset are dedicated to doing good.

Attachment 1: About data collection and reliability and validity of data

Data were collected through 5 questionnaires distributed to all participants who started in the program from 2008 to 2013 (as the program lasts more than one year latests data were collected in 2014). Each participant filled in questionnaires at five testing points: at start of program and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months into the program. Most forms were filled in personally by the participants, in some cases a form was filled in by IICD staff while interviewing the participant.

144 completed or are about to complete the program and filled in a total of 697 questionnaires. 34 who started but did not complete filled in another 68 questionnaires. The total material is a collection of 765 questionnaires. The information from these was entered by IICD staff into data sheets. The data sheets were used in making of this presentation. In order to check reliability of data entry I have reviewed 50 questionnaires from 2012-13 and found them to be consistent with the data sheet information.

Data set 1 - a questionnaire given to all participants at the start of the program included factual information and personal expectations.

Data set 2 and 3 - taken after 3 and 6 months during the training period, consisted of personal ratings on 12 skills (or parameters) on a scale from 1 to 5, where 5 is the most positive and satisfactory and narrative statements on the experience so far. The 12 skills measured each represents dimensions of capacity to perform and to do good. Adding the ratings from all 12 skills creates capacity index that can be used for comparisons.

Data set 4 and 5 - taken after 9 and 12 months during the service period in Africa. These were 6-10 open questions where the participant provided short narrative statements.

A data collection process, where subjective statements and ratings are used to make inferences about real world phenomena, is prone to biases as is any interrogative methodology in the social sciences. Personal beliefs, expectations and values of the respondents will influence information provided.

After filling in the questionnaires, participants shared their statements in a group meeting. Group pressure may have influenced the results, but it is not certain whether the group setting would cause overly optimistic or pessimistic statements. The group discussions at the same time functioned as an inter-subjective control mechanism to the data sets.

Comparison between two individuals based on information from these forms may have limited validity, however, potential biases will over the larger sample influence the data in a consistent manner enabling comparisons. By applying the same questionnaires for six consecutive years from all participants it becomes possible to draw general and reasonably reliable and valid conclusions, and thus to test the main hypothesis.